Digital Journalism

COM466 – University of Washington

Seward Park Restoration Project | Invasive Species Removal

Here’s a soundslide presentation of a restoration project in Seward Park Seattle. The project led by EarthCorps focused on the removal of invasive species in the park. The site worked on that day primarily contained the Himalayan Blackberry or Rubus armeniacus. This species, originally from Armenia in southwest Asia, has spread rapidly in Seattle and surrounding areas because of clear cutting done the during development of the city. This left the land vulnerable to invasives and that’s why we see an abundance of blackberries along with many other invasive species around our city. Another invasive species the group set out to remove was the  English Ivy or Hedera helix, which like the Himalayan Blackberry suffocates native plants.

The work done that day allows EarthCorps to remove the invasives and return in the fall to plant native plants in it’s place. Every six months or so for the next couple years EarthCorps will return to the site to remove new growth of invasive species. Only after the newly planted native species grow large enough, will they be able to prevent the growth of the Himalayan Blackberries and restore the park back to its natural ecosystem.

Click the picture below to enjoy the soundslide!

Seward Park Restoration Project | Invasive Species Removal

Soundslide Presentation

Thanks to EarthCorps, Bastyr University’s volunteer group and all other volunteers

Keala Richardson

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Filed under: Student Projects

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